The Truth About Rapid Weight Loss Equipment

The Truth About Rapid Weight Loss Equipment

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    Judging by the apparent efficacy of weight loss equipment in adverts and infomercials, you’d be forgiven for thinking that losing weight is incredibly easy. Many of the products on show seem to work so well that they have people cashing in on unwanted DVDsonline to try to raise the funds to get the latest miracle pound shifter. However, there’s a dark truth behind these products. An underlying reality that manufacturers do their best to conceal from you. This big secret is that these products don’t work. Here are some of the biggest offenders.

    Toning Shoes

    A couple of years ago, toning shoes were the must have weight loss product. Manufacturers claimed that their bow-soled footwear could help users to burn calories at a higher rate than conventional shoes and could also aid muscle building. In effect, a casual walk in toning shoes was tantamount to a vigorous workout. However, it turns out that the only people who’ll be losing pounds from the enterprise are the various manufacturers who peddle the product, with sports brand Reebok and US footwear company Skechers handed huge fines by the Federal Trade commission in the US after being found guilty of deceiving consumers by making unfounded claims. Firms have also been hit with lawsuits from unhappy customers, who claim that the footwear causes injuries, including stress fractures and even broken wrists from falls.

    Sauna Suits

    If sauna suits had been designed with the sole purpose of making their wearer look ridiculous, then the product would have been one of the most brilliantly effective items ever made. However, the space age looking overalls are in fact supposed to help people lose weight through increased metabolic rate and calorie burning. In reality, any weight loss experienced through wearing the suits is through fluid loss, which is regained as soon as you drink a glass of water. The most noteworthy effects of the suits are that they can lead to dehydration and heat strokes.

    Electronic Ab Belts

    With their roots in 60s Soviet technology, electronic ab belts have their beginnings in a more reliable source than most weight loss fads. However, the end result is still the same: they don’t work. Although the pulsating waist adornments may help to strengthen and tone the abdominal muscles, and are even used to help rehabilitate people recovering from musculoskeletal injuries, they fail to live up to the claim to increase weight loss and the visibility of abs.

    The Shake Weight

    The Shake Weight is advertised by its manufacturer as a revolutionary new exercise product that makes working out with traditional hand weights completely unnecessary. The secret behind the amazing new device lies at its core, with two dual moving weights which, when shaken, create ‘dynamic inertia’, an impressive sounding technology that is said to equate to 250 repetitions per minute. Although reports do suggest that some users feel positive initial effects of the Shake Weight, sustained improvements in tone, weight loss and strength are, as yet, unheard of. The purported effects are likely experienced only due to the body being put under a new stress, forcing it to work harder. However, once your system has adjusted to the new forces involved, the body stops responding to the exercise. To stimulate growth again, it would be necessary to up the resistance of the shake weight, which would likely result in overuse injuries and joint pain.

    Power Balance Bracelet

    Among the many claims made by Power Balance, the manufacturers of the Power Balance bracelet, is that the rubber band could harness holographic technology to resonate with and respond to the natural energy field of the body, with the result that you became better at sport and were able to burn more fat more efficiently. Since the product’s release in 2009, these claims have shockingly been found to be utterly false and, under the Trade Practices Act, Power Balance were ordered to pay $57 million in damages, leaving the company financially ruined. However, before the scammers were rumbled, Power Balance managed to shift over 2.5 million bracelets in 2009, with projected earnings estimated to reach $35 million in 2010; which proves the power of suggestion, if not the power of holographic technology.

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